Short News Items (Summer 2002): There follow some short news items, several of which have appeared elsewhere, compiled for the interest of our readers.

Composer T.J. Anderson, whose tribute to the late William Warfield appeared in the N&O ‘s Letters column August 31 (online at http://www.newsobserver.com/editorials/story/1686953p-1706552c.html ), received an honorary doctorate from Northwestern University in June (along with Kofi Annan and Tony Randall).
 
Conductor Benjamin Keaton and Director Randolph Umberger have left the Durham Savoyards, Ltd., in order to devote all their energies to Long Leaf Opera. Paula Scotland will serve as the Savoyards’ producer this season.
 
Steven Martin, whose leadership helped restore Durham’s Carolina Theatre to solvency, has resigned as director and is running for a seat on Durham’s City Council.
 
Violinist Jeff Thayer, Associate Concertmaster of the NC Symphony, has been engaged as an Assistant Concertmaster by the Atlanta Symphony. His last performances here are expected to be the October classical concerts. As the NCS said in its announcement, our loss is Atlanta’s gain. Rebekah Binford will be the NCS’ Acting Associate Concertmaster this season and Eric McCracken will be Acting Assistant Concertmaster.
 
Conductor Viswa Subbaraman, a product of Duke and UNC and a former student of Tonu Kalam (UNCSO) and William Henry Curry (NCS), spent part of the summer in the conducting program at Brevard, where he worked with Gunther Schuller, and has been awarded a Fulbright grant for eight months of study in France with John Nelson.
 
Conductor James Anderson, another product of UNC (and former student of Tonu Kalam), whose appointments as Music Director of the Appalachian Symphony Orchestra and to the Hayes School of Music at ASU were announced in these pages earlier this summer, has been selected to appear in the American Symphony Orchestra League’s National Conductor Preview, slated for March 2003 and involving in this round the Jacksonville (Florida) Symphony. Last season, the NCS’ Jeffrey Pollock participated in this program, in Chicago.
 
The Canton (OH) Symphony contract of Gerhardt Zimmermann, who has served that orchestra as Music Director since 1980, was extended in June for three additional years. The conductor, whose tenure as the NC Symphony’s Music Director ends this season, is a candidate for Music Director of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and will lead four concerts with that group in January (for details of which, see http://www.njsymphony.org/concertscheduleframe0203.htm [inactive 9/03]). In recent months he has appeared with orchestras in Breckenridge (CO), Indianapolis and Chautauqua (NY).
 
Conductor William Henry Curry of the NC Symphony has been given a new title, effective this season. During the ongoing search for a new music director, he will serve as Interim Artistic Planning Advisor, or IAPA for short. See the whole story (and a recap of his other titles) in Ovation Magazine , published by the NCS and WCPE, at http://www.wcpe.org/overture/NCSO_highlights.shtml [inactive 5/04].
 
Gerald G. Fox has been appointed Interim Executive Director of the NC Dance Theatre, effective August 23. In addition, choreographer Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, Artistic Director of NCDT for the past six years, has been named President of the company; he will continue to serve the organization as Artistic Director as well.
 
Pianist Andrew Tyson, a rising 10th grader at Durham Academy, was one of five Concerto Competition Winners at the Eastern Music Festival this summer. He played the first movement of Beethoven’s Second Concerto with the Guilford Symphony Orchestra conducted by Scott Sandmeier. Tyson has studied piano for eight years, the last five with Mary Elizabeth Turner. He recently won the Young Artist division of the Durham Music Teacher’s Association Spring Festival Competition for his age group.
 
From the Community Music School’s Director Marty Suttle Thomas comes word that clarinetist Jackie Nkuebe, a product of the CMS, has been accepted as a member of the Philharmonic Association’s Triangle Youth Orchestra.
 
Arts organizations that receive funding from the State Arts Council (including the NC Symphony) are breathing sighs of collective relief that cuts in the NCAC’s programs are likely to be no more than 8% , since that is the figure in both the house and senate versions of the (still-unadopted) budget.
 
Finally, we regret to report the death this summer of Durham resident William S. (Bill) Hawkins, 74, former stage manager of the NC Symphony and a long-time driver for Southern Coach Company. He is survived by his wife Ruby S. Hawkins, two daughters and numerous nieces and nephews. We extend our sympathies to Hawkins’ family.

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An Award for Composer Roger Hannay
 
In recognition of his recently published music, composer Roger Hannay has received the distinguished Hinda Honigman Composers’ Cup Award for 2002. UNC Professor Emeritus Hannay received the award from former NC Federation of Music Clubs President Mary Davis at the NCFMC’s 2002 convention, held in Statesville earlier this year. The score featured in the award ceremony was his “Modes of Discourse,” a chamber work commissioned by the Mallarmé Chamber Players in 1988 and revised for them in l994. It is in five short movements, scored for flute, violin and cello. The work was published in 2001 by Media Press, Inc., Champaign, Illinois, and it is this edition for which The Hinda Honigman Composers Cup Award was given. The work is also included on the Mallarmé Chamber Players’ recording of their commissioned works available on Capstone Records (CPS 8684). This is the third Honigman Composers Cup received by the Chapel Hill resident for his published compositions. The others were for “Fantome,” published in l976 by C. F. Peters Music Corporation, and “Sphinx,” published by Seesaw Music Corporation in l979.

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Penka Kouneva Returns to Duke
 
Classical music fans in the Triangle will recall the many contributions to our cultural life made by composer Penka Kouneva during her years of study at Duke, where she was, we understand, the first woman to obtain a doctorate in composition. She has been living in Los Angeles of late, where she has been doing film music, mostly. From time to time she shares news of her successes, and from time to time we’ve passed that news along.
 
Now she’s back, for a relatively short period of time, supervising the preparation and attending several performances of music written and arranged for an upcoming Archipelago Theater Company production of And Mary Wept , written by Ellen Hemphill and Nor Hall. Kouneva shared some notes on the play and her score. She writes that And Mary Wep t “is a metaphor for the contemporary people who have forgotten how to be compassionate and caring. The images in the play grew out of poetic images of apocalypse in a few songs, including ‘Down to the Harbor’ and ‘God’s Away on Business’ [from Blood Money, a collection of works composed for a production of Büchner’s Woyzeck] by Tom Waits, ‘Farewell Angelina’ by Bob Dylan and ‘Just After Sunrise’ by James Taylor. As with all Arhcipelago Productions, there are also quite a few folk songs from Norway, Italy, Bulgaria and Japan.
 
“Ellen Hemphill presented all the songs to me early in the process. My arrangements augmented their theatrical and dramatic aspects (satire, greed, futile competition, resignation, private place) in the context of the play. The sound design at the beginning of the show is a metaphor for the chaotic and noisy soundtrack that accompanies our contemporary lives. [Elsewhere, as in] the ‘Ritual on the Salty Desert,’ the sound evokes the barren and harsh physical environment where the characters go through their own personal transformations.”
 
Kouneva’s biography reveals how far she’s gone and how much she’s accomplished since her time in the Triangle. It says, in part, that “Penka Kouneva is a Sundance Film Composer Fellow, a winner of the Aaron Copland Award and Meet the Composer Fellowship. Previous collaborations with Archipelago include The Abdication , Escurial , Calamity Jane , and Cassandra’s Lullaby . Upon moving to Los Angeles in 1999, she composed music for the films The Picture of Dorian Gray , Shadows , Earth is Heaven , and American Storytellers . Her music-theater Steel: John Henry and the Shaker was produced at the Ford Amphitheatre in 2002. In 1997, she graduated with a Doctoral degree in composition from Duke University.”
 
Kouneva say she “is thrilled to back in North Carolina for And Mary Wept .” Her friends and admirers may wish to know that she will be in Durham for rehearsals till opening night, Wednesday September 25, and that she will be present at performances through September 27. For more information on the run, see our calendar.

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News Updates as of July 9, 2002
 
Raleigh’s City Council has adopted a budget for the current year that contains no direct cuts in its arts grants program and that will preserve arts funding even if the state decides to withhold additional revenues. (We mention this because the N&O twice reported that the contingency plan involves possible cuts of 50%-65%, which is not the case; for details, see the minutes of these sessions at http://www.raleigh-nc.org/citydata/bcc_council.htm [inactive 7/05].) This sets Raleigh apart from other NC cities that are dealing with revenue shortfalls. In Greensboro, for example, the budget for City Arts has been cut by $469,000, from a little less than $1.2M, and things appear grim in Winston-Salem and elsewhere.
 
The NC Symphony has announced the engagement of former Tokyo String Quartet violinist Peter Oundjian as a replacement for conductor Stefan Sanderling, who has accepted the directorship of an orchestra in Florida. Oundjian will lead concerts in Southern Pines and in the Triangle in September.
 
David O’Dell, former associated with Triangle Opera, has been appointed General Director of Opera for the Young (http://www.operafortheyoung.org/ [inactive 11/06]) in Madison, Wisconsin.
 
Congratulations to UNC-based flutist Anne Larson (who performs occasionally with the NC Symphony) and NCS bassist Erik Dyke, married at Raleigh’s Second Empire Restaurant on June 8.
 
We regret to report the recent death of Greensboro philanthropist Leah Tannenbaum, a mainstay of the Eastern Music Festival whom former EMF Artistic Director Sheldon Morgenstern called “the spiritual mother of the festival.” An obituary appeared in Greensboro’s News & Record and remains available online at http://www.news-record.com/news/obits/3742302.htm [inactive 3/04].

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Dana Mallory Named GM of Triangle Youth Phlharmonic
 
The Philharmonic Association (http://philharmonic-association.org/), sponsor of the Triangle Youth Philharmonic, Triangle Youth Symphony and Triangle Youth Orchestra, has announced the appointment of Dana Mallory as General Manager. She was one of the original 35 charter members of the Triangle Youth Philharmonic and played flute and percussion in its first three seasons, beginning in 1988. She was graduated in 1995 from the College of Charleston with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Piano Performance and Music History. She completed her Master of Music Degree in Piano Performance at UNCG in December 2001. In addition to her work for the PA, she maintains a private piano studio at Burt Music Co. Her professional and educational affiliations include the North Carolina Music Teachers Association, the Raleigh Piano Teachers Association, the Raleigh Music Club, the Federation of Music Clubs, and the Cary/Apex Piano Teachers Association. In addition to teaching, she is also the Contemporary Music Director at Christ the King Lutheran Church in Cary. Prior to opening her own studio, she was on the faculty of the Cary School of Music and the Community Music School in Raleigh. She served as interim Executive Director of the Community Music School in 1995. Mallory brings to the PA her personal experience with youth orchestra programs, her advanced musical training, her considerable experience in working with young musicians and her dedication to and enthusiasm for the organization she now continues to serve.
Anna Ludwig Wilson Receives Kathryn H. Wallace Award for Artists in Community Service
Anna Ludwg, Artistic Director of Mallarmé Chamber Players, is a the group’s cofounder and has served as the company’s director since its founding in 1984. The group became a nationally acclaimed ensemble of professional musicians whose mission is to enrich individuals, schools and communities through outstanding musical performances, innovative educational programs, creative collaboration with other organizations and outreach to under-served members of our community. Ms. Wilson’s leadership Mallarmé Chamber Players continues to use chamber music to communicate, partner and build bridges with both traditional and non-traditional sites in the community.
 
Wilson has made the Mallarmé Chamber Players a cultural community resource for bringing diverse groups of people together. Her most recent projects include Music Makes Families and Soul Gone Home.
 
Music Makes Families was daylong event held at Durham Arts Council Building. Through innovative “classes” targeting the family, and are open to all ages, the program’s goal was to encourage and support family members who study or play an instrument; to give basic music appreciation skills to others who do not play; to offer a vehicle for student musicians to take master classes from and play in concert with members of our professional ensemble; to enhance the professional development of music teachers; and to demonstrate the transforming value of music for individuals, families and communities. This event was a collaborative initiative with Mallarmé Chamber Players and the Durham, Chapel Hill and Hillsborough music teachers.
 
The Kathryn H. Wallace Award for Artists in Community Service was created by Kathryn H. Wallace, Contributions Officer at Glaxo from 1987 until her death in August 1991 and a longtime community volunteer in the arts. This award is given annually to recognize an individual practicing artist residing in Wake, Durham, Orange, or Chatham County who has made a significant contribution to the Triangle Community.

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Boston Critic Praises Amateurs
 
A recent article by Boston Globe music critic Richard Dyer struck a responsive chord here because it speaks of the importance of amateur musicians in the overall scheme of our cultural infrastructure. The column, which appeared on May 31, begins as a memorial tribute to Stephen Jay Gould, the celebrated science writer and paleontologist, who died May 20. We hadn’t realized the extent of his involvement in music, which Dyer cites in some detail-Gould was a long-time member of the Boston Cecilia Society, and apparently he rarely hesitated to express his views of the coverage his choral group received in the press. The main thrust of Dyer’s column, however, is the premise that “Professional musical life depends on a solid base of amateur musical culture”-a point we have from time to time articulated in cvnc and one that our writers have made, elsewhere, for years. As in Boston, so in central NC-we’d be far poorer, musically and culturally, without the many contributions, sung and unsung, made by volunteer singers, instrumentalists and, yes, conductors, too, in all the richly varied locations where art is served in our midst.Next time you are talking to a neighbor who sings or plays or buys a season ticket for a classical event (or, for that matter, reads a review), thank him or her, for all of us.
Dyer’s column may be found at http://www.boston.com/.
 
We are grateful to him and to The Boston Globe for permission to provide this link to our readers.

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Death of NC Composer Frederick H. Beyer
 
Word has reached us that composer Frederick H. Beyer died Friday, July 27, 2002, at Moses Cone Hospital, Greensboro, after a short illness. He was 75. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, and began his musical career by accepting an alto saxophone that his father had received as a debt payment. After high school, during WWII, he spent two years in uniform, serving as a member of the US Navy Band. After preparation at Exeter, he attended Harvard University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree. After a year of composition study at the Juilliard School of Music, he earned his Master of Arts at Columbia University and his DMA at Florida State University.
 
In 1967, Beyer became Associate Professor of music at Greensboro College where he taught conducting, music theory, and composition. For many years he served as Chairman of the Theory and Composition Department of the Eastern Music Festival, where his music was often performed. In 1977, Beyer took a leave of absence from Greensboro College and lived on a sailboat moored at Oriental, NC, where he completed his Symphony No. 3 (“Visions of Time and the River”). This was one of his many works performed at the Eastern Music Festival. Among the others were “Three Preludes for Four Hands,” “Conversations,” for brass trio,” “Dialogue and Dance,” “Dance of the Veils” and “The Sea God” (1980), a tone poem commissioned by the Greensboro Symphony that a 1984 EMF program note described as one of his most frequently performed compositions.
 
We extend our sympathies to the composer’s immediate family, to his many colleagues in the music world, to his countless students, and particularly to his sister-in-law, who assisted us with the preparation of this notice, portions of which first appeared in the News & Record.
 
by William Thomas Walker

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NC Symphony Announces Summerfest Guests and Programs
 
The NC Symphony has announced its lineup of visiting artists and programs for Summerfest 2002, slated to begin June 1 and run through July 13. There are seven subscription concerts plus a free July 4 program with fireworks. All programs are on Saturday evenings except for the Independence Day concert. The venue for these popular events is the new Amphitheatre at Regency Park in Cary. Prices: $960 (for VIP tables seating 6 people), $132 (12 “flextix”), & $96 (8 “flextix”). Children 12 and under free to paid concerts; as noted, the July 4 concert is free to all except VIP crescent tables. For program schedules and details as of this writing, click here.