John W. Lambert

John W. Lambert

Since 1977, John W. Lambert, has written reviews and articles published, variously, by The News and Observer, Leader, Spectator, Fanfare, Fi, Independent, CVNC, and CVNA. His studies included violin, piano, voice, and music history. A sketch of his thesis, on the North Carolina Symphony's first 50 years, was published by Greenwood Press, in Symphony Orchestras of the United States: Selected Profiles (ed. Robert R. Craven); and his liner notes for several Toscanini Lps were published by Music and Arts Programs of America, Inc. His latest major publication is The North Carolina Symphony: A History, written in cooperation with Joe A. Mobley, with a foreward by Roy C. Dicks.

He is a recipient of the Raleigh Medal of Arts, the Durham Symphony's "Share the Music" Award, and a Triangle Arts Award.

Lambert is a member of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections and an avid collector of recordings, currently concentrating on conductors Rudolf Kempe, Franz Konwitschny, and the non-BSO discs of Charles Munch. Ever mindful of his late critical mentor Nell Hirschberg's oft'-repeated admonition ("People die when they use up the number of words allocated to them in their lifetimes"), he hopes to live long enough to be able to hear and write about the "best-available" transfers of all of Toscanini's NBC Symphony broadcasts (1937-54), a listening (and collecting) project he began when he was 11.

He cherishes the memory of his time in Uncle Sugar's Canoe Club, including a deployment to Vietnam aboard the Navy's last 8" rapid-fire cruiser, the USS NEWPORT NEWS; he retired after 26+ years of combined active and reserve service, the latter including a substantial hitch in military shipping. His civilian "day jobs" were largely in private-sector and government purchasing and technical writing. He retired as a business officer with NC's Department of Health and Human Services in September 2010.

He is a member of the Music Critics Association of North America and serves on the production team of Classical Voice North America.

(Revised 4/2021.)

Articles by John W. Lambert:

Result Count: 803 (viewing articles 1 through 25)

Wild Contrasts from the Harlem String Quartet

Chamber Music Review by John W. Lambert,  February 20, 2022

Duke Symphony Orchestra Returns to Baldwin for In-Person Concert

Music, Orchestral Music Feature by John W. Lambert,  December 1, 2021

Reconsidering [the Vast Majority of] Robert Schumann's Songs

Recital Media Review by John W. Lambert,  November 25, 2021

Raleigh Civic Symphony Orchestra Premieres The Other Side of the Hungry River by Tift Merritt

Contemporary Music, Orchestral Music Review by John W. Lambert,  November 21, 2021

The Raleigh Symphony Orchestra Is Back, and All Is Well!

Orchestral Music Review by John W. Lambert,  October 23, 2021

Staying up Past Our Accustomed Bedtimes for Great Music – Again! (Hooray!)

Chamber Music Review by John W. Lambert,  September 25, 2021

Zéphyros Blows into Town for CMR's Grand Finales

Review by John W. Lambert,  May 30, 2021

Home for the Holidays – the Raleigh Ringers Mark 30 Years

Handbell Ensemble, Holiday Concert Review by John W. Lambert,  December 13, 2020

Handel, Part 2: Extant Operas

Early Music, Opera Feature by John W. Lambert,  November 26, 2020

So There's a Lot More to Handel than Messiah – Like 24 Other Oratorios, etc.

Choral Music Feature by John W. Lambert,  November 26, 2020

Equal Time for Puccini?

Opera Feature by John W. Lambert,  September 10, 2020

"What? Are you nuts?" the Gentleman Asked. "Verdi, too?"

Opera Feature by John W. Lambert,  September 1, 2020

Grappling with the Grippe? Rossini's Good for What Ails You!

Opera Feature by John W. Lambert,  August 10, 2020

An Idle Mind..., Part II: Korngold's Film Scores

Film, Music Feature by John W. Lambert,  May 7, 2020

An Idle Mind..., or How We Came to Examine All the Film Scores of Shostakovich

Film, Music Feature by John W. Lambert,  April 10, 2020

RSO Presents Mahler with Thandolwethu Mamba, Baritone

Vocal Music Review by John W. Lambert,  March 7, 2020

Profoundly Moving Performance of Dvořák's Requiem by NCMC

Choral Music Review by John W. Lambert,  March 3, 2020