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Performance Art Feature



Hope in the Time of COVID Sees Sleeping Beauty Reawakening in December

August 8, 2020 - Charlotte, NC:


Coping with crisisThe COVID collapse happened quickly on March 13. "We were hours away from the curtain rising on our all-new Fairy-Tailored Sleeping Beauty when we had to postpone the season," says Hope Muir, Charlotte Ballet's artistic director. On the morning before that, Charlotte Symphony's new director of communications, Deirdre Roddin, met with me to discuss future concert coverage at this publication. But the upcoming Saint-Saëns Organ Symphony concert would soon be postponed, among the first performing arts dominoes to fall to the pandemic in the week that followed – along with an annual Women in Jazz fest at the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center, the annual Charlotte Jewish Playwriting Contest at the Levine JCC, a chamber music concert at the Bechtler Museum, and Theatre Charlotte's production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

Tom Gabbard, president and CEO at Blumenthal Performing Arts, last attended a live show on March 11 – in the UK, before he and his wife Vickie returned home and tested positive for COVID-19. The Gabbards quarantined and recovered, but by the day after Charlotte Ballet's postponement, Gabbard had announced that all events at all Blumenthal venues were suspended through April 12. Complying with NC Governor Roy Cooper's executive order suspending all public gatherings of 100 or more people, the Blumenthal directive took all decision making on the Saint-Saëns concert, scheduled for March 20, out of the CSO's hands. Both of the CSO's primary venues, Belk Theater and Knight Theater, are managed by Blumenthal.

So far, the CSO has had to cancel 49 concerts. "That's obviously a huge blow to the organization, both artistically and financially," says Michelle Hamilton, the CSO's interim president and CEO. "The estimated financial impact of these concerts alone is in excess of $1.5 million. This does not include the impact of the pandemic on future concerts and attendance."

On the revenue side, Opera Carolina wasn't as seriously damaged as the CSO, losing just one event, an extensively revised version of Douglas Tappin's I Dream. "The company received support through the Payroll Protection Plan [PPP]," says Opera Carolina's artistic director James Meena. "That has allowed us to maintain our staff and redirect funds to our new online series, which has provided employment to our resident company."

PPP funding has flowed to the most established arts organizations in Charlotte, including Theatre Charlotte, Children's Theatre of Charlotte, Actor's Theatre of Charlotte, Blumenthal Performing Arts, and the Charlotte Symphony. "However," Children's Theatre artistic director Adam Burke points out, "the PPP was designed to help organizations through what Congress thought was going to be a short-term, eight-week issue."

Blumenthal drew the largest PPP allotment, $1.7 million, that helped with payroll in May and June. "We avoided furloughs until July 5," says Gabbard, "when three full-time and 114 part-time team members were furloughed – 105 full-time remain, mostly working from home, with some working in the venues on various maintenance projects. PPP made a big difference."

What lies ahead for all Charlotte performing arts groups is very murky, subject to weekly health directives from city or state government officials loosening or tightening restrictions. "Opera is dealing with a multitude of challenges," says Meena, "caused by COVID-19 and now the 43% reduction in ASC [Arts & Science Council] support for the 2020-2021 season. We are evaluating audience concerns for attending performances and, perhaps more dauntingly, health and safety concerns for our performing company.

"Singing is one of the most effective ways to spread the coronavirus. Many church choirs are rehearsing remotely, so imagine a 50-voice opera chorus, principal artists, extras and the more than 30 technicians who normally work on an opera production. Additionally, health and safety concerns for the orchestra musicians (imagine being confined – maybe consigned is a better word – to the orchestra pit where social distancing is all but impossible) are challenges to performing Grand Opera that we have never experienced before."

All of the companies we've mentioned have pivoted to online programming, but all weren't equally prepared to make the switch. Charlotte Ballet, the first company impacted by the COVID ban on public assembly, was quickest to steer a fresh course. "I had implemented a much more robust structure for archiving and curating digital content over the past three years," says Muir, "not just performance footage but interviews with artists, designers, collaborators and behind-the-scenes rehearsal footage as well as the documentation of the Choreographic Lab. That commitment, I think, is why we were able to get out of the gate so quickly."

Raiding their digitized vaults, Charlotte Ballet was able to present Dispersal online, repackaging the company's Innovative Works 2019 program with behind-the-scenes footage for a new kind of digital experience on March 27, just two weeks after Sleeping Beauty had been scheduled to premiere. Opera Carolina's iStream series began in April and is archived on its YouTube channel, while the Charlotte Symphony has logged an assortment of live Zoom and pre-recorded material online. For six straight Wednesday evenings, ending on July 29, they streamed a series of Al Fresco chamber music concerts recorded on video in the backyard of principal cellist Alan Black. It's an avenue that will likely be revisited. Meanwhile, the CSO has extensive recorded inventory to call upon, but unlike Charlotte Ballet, it is entirely audio, so their outlet of choice has been WDAV 89.9, where past concerts are aired on Friday evenings.

The mass exodus to streaming platforms has been global, creating a glut of available online events that don't quite measure up to live performances. Charlotte Ballet has responded to this oversaturation by thinking outside the box. "I worked with choreographer Helen Pickett to discuss our options and this resulted in an opportunity for five of our dancers," says Muir. "Charlotte Ballet joins artists from Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Dance Theater of Harlem for part III of a trilogy Helen developed titled Home Studies, which is entirely choreographed and rehearsed via Zoom."

Other companies are pushing the envelope by reimagining live performance under COVID restrictions. Rehearsing with masks and performing unmasked live at their dance studio, Caroline Calouche & Co. presented two online showings of A Love Show on July 25, charging admission for a ticket link. Theatre Charlotte is trying a more audacious outdoor model, presenting Grand Nights for Singing: The Parking Lot Performances on Friday nights outside their building, limiting audience size to 25, and charging $10 per ticket. Each of two performing singers wields a separate mic, there are no duets, and the audience is expected to provide their own chairs, snacks, and beverages.

"We are most likely not going to be able to perform for an audience in TC until at least December and maybe beyond," says Ron Law, who was scheduled to retire June 30 but has extended for another season as Theatre Charlotte artistic director – and as President of the Board of the North Carolina Theatre Conference. "We have purchased appropriate video equipment so we can livestream productions. At this time, we are planning on doing performances of What I Did Last Summer by A.R. Gurney that will be livestreamed, with a per household ticket charge, on three dates in September."

Waiting until June 11 to announce their 2020-21 season, Theatre Charlotte has prudently delayed their musical productions, The Sound of Music and Pippin, until spring 2021 – with understandable contingency plans. For their fall plays, they are tentatively offering their audience the options of live performances or streaming. Children's Theatre have allowed themselves less wiggle room for 2020-21, eliminating musicals entirely from their slate. Yet their company, with video production a longtime component of their educational offerings, is probably the most adept we have in Charlotte when it comes to hybrid, live-or-streamed presentation skills.

While closing down all public performances at their two ImaginOn theaters, Children's Theatre was at the tail-end of a 20-week School of Theatre Training programs, which culminates in four fully-produced OnStage presentations, two plays and two musicals. "We decided to move all four productions to a virtual format," says Burke. "We've made other adjustments as well. We started some online educational programming and shifted our June summer camps to virtual experiences. In July we offered students the choice of virtual or in-person camps. We've kept close watch on all CDC, state and federal guidelines and have invested in some technologies that help us to maintain safety."

Like Charlotte Ballet, Children's has plenty of past performance video on file. They've edited these multi-camera shoots and served them up on a series of "Watch Party" webcasts. The new work keeps coming, further underscoring CTC's technical prowess. "We've continued to move forward, as best we can, with the works that are in development including a collaboration with 37 children's theaters across the country to adapt, as a virtual performance, the book A Kids Book About Racism." That new piece launched into cyberspace on August 1. Other projects in the pipeline are Tropical Secrets: Holocaust Refugees in Cuba, and a stage adaptation of the award-winning The Night Diary.

On March 12, the day before performing arts in Charlotte abruptly shut down, the town was abuzz in anticipation of Mecklenburg County announcing its first case of COVID-19. A surreal five months later – without any improvement, to be sure – announcements for the 2020-21 season, sensibly stalled in March, are beginning to flow amid a chaotic atmosphere in anticipation of the fall. Once again, Charlotte Ballet is at the vanguard, announcing that the long-delayed premiere of Sleeping Beauty: A Fairy-Tailored Classic will open at Belk Theater on December 10 – replacing the traditional Yuletide presentation of Nutcracker. Makes sense: the trimmed-down Tchaikovsky ballet remains family-friendly with a helpful narrator to keep us abreast of the storyline. Unlike Nutcracker, the Tailored Sleeping Beauty doesn't consign the Charlotte Symphony to the orchestra pit, and it doesn't recruit 150 sacrificial lambs for children's roles, including the ever-lovable Clara.

Iffier but on the schedule is Charlotte Ballet's 50th Anniversary Celebration, scheduled for April 22-24. Muir is "holding onto a beacon of hope" that the CSO will be able to collaborate with the ballet on that auspicious event, booked at Belk Theater. Opera Carolina maestro Meena has seen his own commitments scuttled in Italy, where he had planned to conduct Andrea Chenier, Manon Lescaut and Turandot. He doesn't expect opera to resume in Italy until December, so he isn't counting on Opera Carolina collaborating with the CSO before 2021. Meanwhile, expect the unexpected as Opera Carolina fires up a new chamber music series, reviving their iStream Online concerts the week of September 11, returning every two weeks through November 16.

Keeping his eyes open for online options and live opportunities, Actor's Theatre artistic director Chip Decker isn't counting on returning to live performance at Queens University before July 2021. Tom Hollis, theatre program director at Central Piedmont Community College, retired on August 1. But he didn't go out directing a final season of CPCC Summer Theatre as he had planned, so he's expecting to reprise the complete 2020 slate in the spring or summer of 2021. Sense and Sensibility, originally set for this past April, may also figure in the mix.

Gabbard, the first to respond to our questionnaire on July 14, said that over 300 performances had already been cancelled at Blumenthal's multiple facilities and wasn't expecting national tours – their bread and butter – to resume "until at least late fall, and perhaps early 2021." Even outdoor stopgaps that Gabbard might stage in Charlotte's Uptown must remain on the back burner until public gatherings of 100 or more are approved.

On the lookout for best practices and inspiration, Gabbard is looking globally, "including Seoul, Korea, where big musicals like Phantom have played throughout the pandemic. I was asked to join the COVID-19 Theater Think Tank in New York, where we are speaking with academics and thought leaders in a search not only for short-term solutions, but also ways to improve our venues and hygiene practices long-term."

Bach Akademie Charlotte artistic director Scott Allen Jarrett slowly realized last spring that there was no way to mobilize the musicians, patrons, and audience that would be necessary to make the third annual Charlotte Bach Festival happen last June. Hurriedly, he pulled together a four-day virtual festival that streamed on Facebook, YouTube, and Zoom. Much like Actor's Theatre and CPCC Summer Theatre, Jarrett is hoping that the June 2020 event will happen in June 2021.

The experience shook him. "The recognition that I hadn't made music with another human being in a month hit me hard on Easter Sunday morning," Jarrett recalls, "and I grieved deeply for several weeks. Gradually, the shared recognition of all that we were losing with one another affirmed a shared value for communal music making. Those conversations continue to sustain me."

Jarrett is busy, busy, busy these days up in Boston, working as artistic director with the Back Bay Chorale on their new Zoom curriculum and as director of music at Boston University's Marsh Chapel – and expecting to stay healthy. BU has taken the plunge, plowing millions of dollars into testing in an attempt to bring their student body back to campus, aiming to test all faculty weekly and all students twice weekly. Plans for the 2021 Charlotte Bach Festival are on hold, says Jarrett, until a proven vaccine delivers true COVID immunity.

Yet he's clearly upbeat, even if he's forced to deliver the 2021 Bach Experience via Zoom. Describing her own company's trials, Charlotte Ballet's Muir offers the best explanation for this paradox: "Once we realized this virus was not going anywhere quickly, we had to pivot and focus on new ways to keep the team motivated and creative. And this is where artists thrive! At our core, we are shape-shifters and it's exhilarating to think of new ways to communicate and engage with one another."