IF CVNC.org CALENDAR and REVIEWS are important to you:

If you use the CVNC Calendar to find a performance to attend
If you read a review of your favorite artist
If you quote from a CVNC review in a program or grant application or press release

Now is the time to SUPPORT CVNC.org

Musical Theatre Review Print



CPCC Reopens Halton Theater with Andrew Lloyd Webber's Joseph, an Old Hit for a New Generation


Event  Information

Charlotte -- ( Fri., Jul. 9, 2021 - Sun., Jul. 25, 2021 )

Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) Theatre: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat
$18 - $15 -- Halton Theater , 704.330.6534, Tickets available online. , http://ww.cpcc.edu/

July 9, 2021 - Charlotte, NC:


July 9, 2021, Charlotte, NC - Before this weekend, Halton Theater hadn't opened its doors to a theatre crowd since February 2020, and Central Piedmont Community College Summer Theatre had been dark since July 2019, when they closed their five-show season with A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder. Returning to the Halton stage as guest director of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Tom Hollis posed a poignant question during his introductory remarks. Does it really count as a season when a company offers its audience just one production? Even the most loyal Central Piedmont supporter can't buy a 2021 season ticket, that's for sure. And until Central Piedmont Community College completes its recovery from a debilitating ransomware attack this past winter, they won't be able to accept credit card payments at their Overcash ticket windows. Cash or checks for walk-ups, plastic for online sales only.

Opening night at Halton was a cautious first step back toward pre-pandemic norms – with a Delta-be-damned giddiness to it as COVID protocols were loosened at last. For most of the crowd mingling in the Halton lobby before and after the show, this was probably the first public event they had risked in at least 16 months, a milestone moment. For the theatre folk scattered among us, it was an emotional reunion – an affirmation.

Last season was originally envisioned as Hollis's grand valedictory after nearly four decades at Central Piedmont, his latter years as theatre department chair. An encore reset of the lost 2020 season was rumored for a while as Central Piedmont scrambled with their winter programming, so Joseph is a double surprise – not among the shows announced for the lost 47th Central Piedmont Summer Theatre season and the only show replacing them. Previously mounted in Summer 1993 and revived in Summer 2001 at the now-demolished Pease Auditorium (the CPCC Theatre production of 2008 at the Halton was a wintertime affair) – with rousing success on all occasions – Joseph is likely more bankable than Footloose, lighter on the budget than The Music Man, and far better-known and cheaper to produce than Something Rotten! Additionally, there is likely a finely calculated ecology in a true Central Piedmont Summer season that allows the college the biggest bang for their bucks when auditioning and casting their overall troupe of performers and designers. These discarded musicals, plus Peter Pan Jr. and a Ken Ludwig comedy, might conceivably be in cold storage, slated for resurrection in 2022.

Sitting in Row K, I only noticed one gentleman taking a restroom break during this intermission-free presentation, and I was somewhat surprised that the cast began taking their bows a mere 71 minutes after the show commenced. Another eight minutes came packaged in a "Megamix" reprise of Webber's most bodacious songs – or parodies, since the composer delights in shuttling among an unlikely array of genres in retelling the most epic tale from the Book of Genesis, aided by Tim Rice's lyrics. The news of Joseph's demise is delivered to his doting father, Jacob, in the form of a sobbing lone-prairie cowboy song. Pharaoh is transformed into a pre-historic Elvis as he rocks his account of his prophetic dreams. The poverty of Joseph's 11 brothers during the years of famine takes on the nostalgic air of a sad French café, complete with Apache dancer, and Naphtali's pleas for the innocence of little brother Benjamin come in the form of a Caribbean calypso.

Curiously, the irreverence and multitudinous anachronisms of this Webber-Rice concoction, not to mention the narrative alterations of Holy Writ, have never seemed to spark any massive public outcry from Judeo-Christian clergy. Maybe the outright anachronisms, beginning with the Technicolor in the title, insulate all the irreverence and textual tinkering from being taken seriously. James Duke's scenic design and Bob Croghan's costume design underscore the assurance that we are not in the immediate vicinity of ancient Egypt or Canaan, fortified by the equally anachronistic projection designs by Infante Media. No, this is more like a Disney or a Las Vegas style of Egypt, with Duke taking full advantage of the lordly height of the Halton stage compared with Pease's pancake panorama. Our Elvis is also a Vegas version, clearly the sequined, jumpsuited, decadent superstar of his latter days. The Duke-Infante collaboration is so glittery and colorful that it is only slightly upstaged by Croghan's creations for Pharaoh and Joseph.

You don't often get the chance to design a costume that is hyped in the title of a show, and Croghan, on the Charlotte scene even longer than I, doesn't disappoint. The impact of this mid-pandemic return to live theatre caught me off-guard several times. Each time a major character made his or her first entrance – Lindsey Schroeder as our Narrator, Rixey Terry as Joseph, and J. Michael Beech as Pharaoh – I had that tingling sensation of recognizing something basic and exciting that had been missing in my life for over a year.

My biggest surprise, a frisson of renewal, came from the audience when they reacted to the most iconic moment in Joseph, when the brothers picked up the skirts of Croghan's knockout dreamcoat so that it formed a pinwheel around Terry, spinning around as he, Schroeder, and the ensemble sang "Joseph's Coat." Anybody even glancingly familiar with musical theatre anticipates this moment before it happens, or at least recalls it fondly from a previous encounter. But part of the audience at Halton erupted in delighted and surprised laughter, recalling what the first London and Broadway and high school audiences must have experienced when Joseph was new and reminding me of my own delight back in 1993.

Terry walked a treacherous tightrope, blending innocence with vanity as beautifully and energetically as any Joseph I've ever seen, lacking the cloying wholesomeness that only true Donny Osmond fans will miss. Maybe a plunge or two into that saccharine syrup might make Terry more memorable in "Any Dream Will Do," but I would prefer that he add a sprinkling of excess to those melodramatic moments when he is unjustly imprisoned, crying out his "Close Every Door." Lighting designer Jeff Childs does come to the prisoner's rescue, adding some spiritual gravitas.

Schroeder was brimful of brilliance as the Narrator, infusing enough energy into her string of recitatives that it never devolved into tedious singsong, though she was often unintelligible. Beech's misfortunes with his microphone were even more egregious as Pharaoh, including intermittent sonic dropouts, but his audio setup was likely jostled over the course of the evening, since he donned different costumes and headgear for his other roles: Jacob, Potiphar, and the doomed Baker.

Admittedly, it's churlish of me to keep harping on Central Piedmont's defective sound equipment and the cavalcade of professional-grade technicians who have failed to tame it. North of $115 million are being spent on replacing Pease, originally a lecture hall, with a genuine theatre facility, while Central Piedmont's audio woes have gone unaddressed since 2005, when the Halton was new. But new generations come to the Halton every year, and new summer visitors from afar get their first taste of Charlotte theatre there – and they still need to be cautioned. By the time the "Megamix" came around on opening night, Beech's "Song of the King" was only fitfully audible and Schroeder's mic was intermittently dropping out.

More power, then, to the performers onstage who merrily soldiered through. Even the charade of the brothers' mournful moments was untarnished. All of the cameo solos hit their marks. Matthew Howie was hilariously rusticated as Reuben delivering the bad news to Jacob with "One More Angel," and Neifert Enrique as Simeon – aided by his brothers and Emma Metzger's scene-stealing table dance – brought a boulevardier's wistful regret to "Those Canaan Days," with more than a soupçon of self-mockery in his lamentations.

Even more irrepressible and irresistible was the calypso lightness and joy that Griffin Digsby brought to the "Benjamin Calypso" as Naphtali. Around the third or fourth time Digsby reached the "Oh no! Not he!" refrain, I had to stop myself, for I had started to sing along. Just another adjustment I'll need to make after 16 months of consuming theatre in front of my computer monitor and TV set. It was hard to be displeased by anything that accompanied this welcome change.

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat continues through Sunday, July 25. For more details on this production, please view the sidebar.